Are Your Anti-Aging Creams Making Your Skin Look Worse?

Are Your Anti-Aging Creams Making Your Skin Look Worse?

Experts Say Wrinkle Creams Can Make Skin Worse

The global skin care market alone is worth an estimated $111 billion and it’s safe to say that the market is not slowing down any time soon. Many women spend a small fortune on anti-aging creams in hopes of regaining their once youthful appearances. Many of us are guilty of slathering these lotions and potions on our faces simply because they say ‘anti-aging’ on the cover. One skin expert, however, argues that some of these creams could be wreaking mayhem on our skin, leading to clogged pores, breakouts and essentially a leap in cases of adult acne – 50% of adult women suffer at some point and anti-aging creams may be the culprit!

The Bad Side of ‘Anti-Aging’ Creams

According to a UK study conducted by Superdrug (2013); women buy an average of 38 different products for their face annually! So what are all of these products doing to your face? Dr Michelle Braude (skin doctor and nutritionist) proclaims that many of those expensive creams, particularly those that are lipid-rich, purchased in hopes of combatting lines and wrinkles could be the sole cause of breakouts and adult acne instead.

Braude explains that “’Aging itself causes cell turnover to slow down so dead skin cells build up and can get trapped in pores. In addition to this, once women see their first lines, they often turn to thick creams and moisturizers that can further clog pores.’ as reported by the Daily Mail.
It is important to exfoliate at least a couple of times a week to get rid of the excess buildup of cells, or better yet to use a microdermabrasion device to unclog the pores and remove excess dead skin cells.

The Hidden Dangers of Coconut oil

Coconut butter and oil have been hailed as the ‘perfect’ all-purpose beauty go-tos, but Braude explains, that they are some of the worst acne inducing offenders. Coconut oil is comedogenic , in other words, it clogs the pores and thus leads to acne. When reading all of the latest skin-care do’s and don’ts, one must take into account their own age and skin type. Coconut oil can be great for those with younger skin or skin that is very dry. But for more mature skin with fine lines and wrinkles, in reality, it can lead to breakouts and the development of acne – the last thing you need when desperately trying to reduce wrinkles.

The Solution: Anti-Aging Without the Acne

So how can we reduce wrinkles and fine lines without further irritating the skin, or worse, causing acne?

1) Protection

The best cream you could possibly invest in is one that will prevent the formation of wrinkles in the first place, and that of course is sun lotion! Need we say more?

2) Food

As expressed in our last article, one of the best ways to combat dull, aging skin is through food. Antioxidants in particular help to eliminate free radicals. Braude explains that ‘The three main antioxidants contained in food that are crucial for healthy, glowing skin and helping to fight acne are Vitamin C, Vitamin A and Vitamin E.’ See our last blog post on ‘5 Essential Nutrients for Beautiful Skin’ for more information on which foods to increase in your diet for glowing skin.

3) The Future Is Now!

Harness the power of radio-frequency for skin tightening and wrinkle reduction. With a little help from science you can combat the signs of aging without slathering all those lotions on your face. With Silk’n wrinkle reduction technology, the FDA clinically approved Silk’n Facetite device works by increasing the production of collagen from within, working with biological systems in the body to achieve a more youthful appearance. Radio-frequency has long been many celebs secret youth inducing weapon before stepping out on the red carpets. Now you can get your very own personal device and say bye bye to those pore-clogging ‘anti-aging’ creams.

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